Author Archives: JoAnn Yoshimoto

Diversity in Fundraising: Making a Long-Term Commitment

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Growing up in Kentucky during segregation, Jimmie Alford – The Alford Group’s founder – attended an all-white school, and didn’t experience racial diversity until the age of nine when his parents moved to Chicago. The move, due to the closing of coal mines, placed Jimmie’s family in a small apartment in the Englewood community. Jimmie was one of three white students in his third grade class of 40 students.

Along with his classmates, he understood economic diversity and its impact on themselves, their families and their community while living in extreme poverty within a predominantly affluent nation. He also directly and personally saw and felt the impact of discrimination. He decided at a young age that the injustice of discrimination was something he would never allow to penetrate his life and that he would work his entire life to eradicate it in all forms. Like many who grow up marginalized in one way or another, Jimmie vowed to lift himself out of his circumstances, make a better life and never forget the important life lessons learned along the way. His commitment to this goal was unwavering and steadfast.

Diversity

Diversity is one of seven core values of The Alford Group, and one of Jimmie’s enduring “fingerprints” on the consulting firm he founded in 1979. One manifestation of this commitment is our 20+-year sponsorship of the Diversity Workshop and Diversity Art Showcase at the annual AFP International Conference. While our dedication to diversity and inclusiveness has remained resolute over the decades, the demographics of America – and thus the universe of donors and prospective donors – have changed dramatically. Lessons learned from diverse communities, and the shared values of diversity, equity and inclusiveness (DEI), are more relevant and more essential today than ever before. Continue reading

Multiply Your Impact: Enlist Key Donors to Create a Meaningful Stewardship Plan

 

By Wendy Hatch, CFRE, Vice President and JoAnn Yoshimoto, CFRE, Senior Consultant

Don’t we all agree that the most precious things in life are worthy of our best attention, effort and care? In the fundraising world, the most precious “things” are our donors and their philanthropic dollars.

Who among us has the luxury of a daily schedule that is just waiting to be filled with new ideas and activities? Nobody that we know! So let’s take 15 minutes – only one percent of our day – to ponder ways to work smarter and multiply the impact of our efforts, and benefit the most precious “things” – our donors!

How do you make sure that your donor stewardship is intentional, timely and effective? You need to plan for it! Wonderful ideas for individual stewardship activities, timelines and plans abound on the internet, so we aren’t going to reiterate them here. The idea we are offering is a strategy for multiplying the impact of your stewardship planning process by also using it as an engagement opportunity for key donors, staff and board members. Continue reading

Fundraising in the Asian Community

As one of the most ethnically diverse cities in North America, Vancouver, BC was the perfect setting for the 2014 Giving Institute Summer Symposium. Though I may be biased, I thought one of the highlights of the four-day Symposium was a panel discussion on fundraising in the Asian community. While the topic is vast – the Asian community encompasses more than 40 different ethnic groups – panelists shared their experience working with the Chinese community, both in Vancouver and in mainland China. I had the honor of moderating the session, which opened with a challenge by Dr. Tom Matthews, Head of School at St. George’s School in Vancouver, to a common perception about Asian donors:

“There’s often an underlying premise among mainstream fundraisers that ‘they’ (meaning ethnically diverse donors) don’t understand American-style philanthropy and thus are not good prospects. This sweeping generalization, if taken at face value, can result in many missed opportunities.” Continue reading